Ross County Genealogical Society
Ross County Genealogical Society
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Listings: 1 to 6 of 6
1.  
The head of households may not be the informant for enumeration. Sometimes the only person at home would be one of the kids or a servant who "thinks he may have been born in...". It wasn't unheard of to get the information from a neighbor.
Last Updated: 18 December 2018
2.  
Information was supposed to be recorded as of the official census day, not the day the enumerator came. The information may have been given as of any time in that range. This can result in the same people being enurmerated in different locations.
Last Updated: 18 December 2018
3.  
Begin with the latest census available and work backwards. Census records have been taken since 1790. Before 1790 you can use Tax Lists and other local lists that might have been compiled according to the state in which you are researching. Ohio census starts in 1820.
Last Updated: 14 December 2018
4.  
A census is an official counting of the population living in a given locality on a designated day set at intervals. The census places an ancestor in a specific place at a specific time.
Last Updated: 14 December 2018
5.  
The U.S. census is closed to the public for 72 years after it is taken.
Last Updated: 13 December 2018
6.  
The U.S. census is taken every 10 years on a designated census day by an "enumerator" in a specific area, E.D. (enumeration district). The first census was done in 1790; there are no censuses before 1790.
Last Updated: 13 December 2018